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-fire. netanyahu said israel is prepared to take whatever action is necessary to defend itself. and egypt, which is brokering a deal between the two sides, cancelled a press conference where officials were expected to announce a deal with terms for a cease-fire. tomorrow, secretary clinton meets with the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas and then will fly to egypt to speak with president mohamed morsi. that is going to be a very interesting conversation, because, of course, as so many of you are aware, morsi is in a tough situation. many of the people in egypt, obviously, don't support working with israel at all. and within the past hour, there were several explosions in gaza city. let's get straight to our team there. >> obviously, looks like we're having a problem with that shot. we'll be getting there in just a moment. difficult to communicate with them, because of these rockets that have been going off. let's try again. let's go back there to ben. >> here in gaza. there were a few hours of relative quiet. but as we have seen within really the last 15 minutes, an intense attack on a buildi
this has played out particularly, clearly mohamed morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it came to trying to mediate deals between these two sides, egypt has always played something of a pretty critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the west and is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity significantly closer to the hamas leadership here in gaza. that really changed a lot of the dynamics and the way we've been seeing things play out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical te
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
don't. >> dana: we will explain it in the break. we have to go. major power grab in egypt. susan rice blames the intel community. the anti-muslim video that we talk, he will speak for the first time. the foreign policy roundup is next. in [ male announcer ] are you considering a new medicare plan? then you may be looking for help in choosing the right plan for your needs. so don't wait. call now. whatever your health coverage needs, unitedhealthcare can help you find the right plan. open enrollment to choose your medicare coverage begins october 15th and ends december 7th. so now is the best time to review your options and enroll in a plan. medicare has two main parts, parts a and b, to help cover a lot of your expenses, like hospital care... and doctor visits. but they still won't cover all of your costs. now's the time to learn about unitedhealthcare plans that may be right for you. are you looking for something nice and easy? like a single plan that combines medicare parts a & b with prescription drug coverage? a medicare advantage plan can give you doctor, hospital and prescriptio
egypt is expected to play a key role in brokering a truce and trying to maintain it. clarissa ward reports from caro this morning. >> reporter: good morning. >> we were expecting some type of announcement last night regarding a cease-fire. what happened? >> reporter: that's the million dollar question. everyone here in egypt was expecting for president morsi to make an announcement last night. they schedule ad time 9:00 p.m. local. the english language newspaper here has the headline as israel and gaza agree on a cease-fire. that's the level of confidence here that people felt that there was going to be a cease-fire agreement. now trying to determine why that agreement never happened is very difficult. obviously people on each side have different opinions. one official with the freedom and justice party which is the political wing of the muslim brotherhood told us the israelis requested to postpone the agreement for another day and she told us we would hear something later today. but at this stage nobody really knows. >> secretary of state hillary clinton is on her way to egypt. wh
to "early start." today a very important day in the middle east. particularly in egypt. delegations from both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement
, as egypt's new president rewrites the rules. >> the crowds are rowdy, rough, and down right rude, and the holiday shopping season has only just begun. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm radi kaye. it's 8:00. from maine to florida, millions of people are heading home as the thanksgiving holiday is wrapping up. today is usually one of the busiest travel days of the year, but so far it has been surprisingly quiet. cnn national correspondent suzanne candiotti is in new york hanging out with a few travellers this morning. suzanne, good morning to you. so i guess it's still pretty early in the day, but it should probably get pretty busy there later on. >> oh, it probably will pick up, but the best news of the day at this hour, anyway, is that there are virtually no backups to check in and no lines at security. there was a little flurry of activity earlier this morning, but now it's practically dead. this is the best time to fly on this busy, busy holiday weekend. of course, it is expected to pick up as the day goes on, but some of the things that are working in new york's favor, the weath
have added on to that the arab spring, which gave us new leadership in egypt. how scary is this that mohammed morsi will be a source for good. >> clearly they have a right to defend themselves, and they have to protect their citizens. we have to remember the united states it's as if washington d.c. was being attacked from the state of maryland. it's very, very serious what's happening there. i think as far as the arab spring, clearly the environment has changed, and i think the united states now is looking to morsi so look to hamas to get them to stop shooting. hopefully you can take advantage of the negative situation and start talking about peace. >> president morsi has his own problems at home too in terms of trying to be tough on hamas, which, after all, is part of the muslim brotherhood and the palestinians. do you think he can be helpful? has he been helpful? >> i don't know that he has. clearly we've benefitted from almost 40 years now of having peace partners between israel and egypt even though the egyptian government never told the people of egypt how important
of israel and hamas are in egypt separately for peace talks. hamas issuing its demand for a cease-fire. they want israel to end a long-running military blockade of gaza immediately. the carnage from the last 24 hours, arwa damon is in gaza city. >> reporter: the large slab of concrete and mangled metal finally gives way. buried beneath it, another lifeless body. it's the second child we've seen. there was also a baby. others in the neighborhood say the blast killed all ten people who lived here. israel says it was targeting a man who heads a rocket launch unit. people we spoke with said they never heard of him. this was a family home. >> people here are telling us that so far those who have been killed in this strike have been women and children. and they have not been able to find any survivors. just moments ago, from that back corner, they did pull out the body of a tiny child. an over here there's another frantic effort under way. tempers easily flare as frustration and anger mount. >> she's my uncle's wife, this young man shouts. rage coupled with sorrow etched across his face
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
. appreciate it. [ sirens ] >>> new violence today in egypt. taking a look at this. protesters throwing rocks, police firing tear gas. fight for democracy intensifying there. cairo's tie rear square. grounds for protester. you hear the chanting. demonstrators are not leaving the square until president morsi withdraws the sweeping powers he granted himself last week. ressa sayah joining us live from cairo. it was billed as the opposition's biggest show of force yet. demonstrators converging, various points throughout the city. what do they hope to accomplish? what is the message? >> reporter: the message is they want to either oust president morsi or have him reverse his controversial decrees announced last thursday. this is an incredible site here behind us the tahrir squire, billed as 1 million man demonstration. not sure if there are 1 million people here, but certainly at lot of people. i'll zoom into tahrir square. the crowd is loud, energized, excited. tens of thousands of people here representing different factions in egypt. representing women's rights groups, western-style liberals, se
through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged about. they're describe this as a power grab by mr. morsi. does it seem that most people understand that and does it make a difference at all? >> reporter: no. they reject that position by mr. morsi, and that explains the outrage. dramatic scenes in tahrirr square, including alexandria and port sayid. these are reminiscent of what we saw last year. it was then aimed at then president hosni mubarak. today the fury is aimed at mr. morsy. >> they were throwing rocks and monthly taf cocktails. the security forces shooting tear gases in the air. very similar scenes to last year. a similar slogan as well, fred. last year we
in preparation for war. >> ben joins us by phone this morning. egypt's prime minister paid a visit to gaza. somehow that going so far? >> well, it was originally planned it would be a three-hour cease fire while the egyptian prime minister was making this visit to gaza. according to our sources, it doesn't appear either side significantly reduced their level of military activity in gaza. certainly before the sun came up there was an intense air attack on gaza itself. it may have been lessened somewhat in the morning while the prime minister was touring gaza. but after he's gone, it's expected to get back to the same pace. >> there are elections coming up not too long from now in israel. palestinians are saying that may be part of the impetus for israel to be taking action. >> certainly this is what you hear oftentimes. tc it was the casame case in the 2008, 2009 offensive. they say the leaders are motivated by a desire to show they're strong on hamas. in fact, we spoke to one palestinian lawmaker who stressed the point that really this is all about politics. >> and ben, of course, one of t
the situation all over the middle east has changed dramatically in the last year. egypt is no run by a dictator, it's run by the muslim brotherhood. should president obama put more pressure on the egyptian government, even threat tone cutoff aid to get hamas to stop firing those rockets? >> he needs to exert every kind of pressure he can to try to make sure it doesn't escalate into a full-blown war between the palestinians and the israelis. whatever that takes. the problem the israelis have is that these rockets are being fired on them from places they can't reach by flying over in the air. they are putting them in school yards where they are surrounded by school children and they are firing them from marketplace that is are crowded with people. israel has a right to protect its self. if sending ground troops in is the only way they can clean out these nests of rockets being fired at them, you know, you can't blame them for doing it. >> all right. let's turn to benghazi. both of you held closed-door hearings this week with top administration officials. and david petraeus reportedly said in thes
of state hillary clinton is in egypt. earlier she met with palestinian president mahmoud abbas and prime minister netanyahu and had this to say. >> america's commitment to israel is rock solid and unwavering. the rocket attacks from terrorist organizations inside gaza on israeli cities and towns must end and a broader calm restored. gregg: general jack keane is a four star general retired. general, great to see you. this is shuttle diplomacy. she has been in jerusalem, ramallah, now cairo. can a cease-fire be brokered here? >> i don't think she would be here unless they believed a cease-fire can be obtained. i also believe she is here because they had legitimate concerns about netanyahu going on the ground in gaza. >> what does hamas wants out of this? >> they want open borders, access to those borders in a way they don't have them now. they want the naval blockade removed. they want a significant improvement in trade. >> reporter: wouldn't that facilitate even more smuggling of rockets into gaza most of them made by iran. >> they are pushing them through africa, into the sinai, and that
at these pictures. cairo, egypt. thousands of people chanting. morsi, the president of that country, recently the stowed absolute powers among himself. about 60,000 people in the square. numbers reportedly growing. those pictures speaking for themselves. connell: day five out of those protests. right now, let's make you a little money. charles payne. dagen: what do you got? charles: i am driving down 151st street, a gigantic line of people all the way down the block. they were at the house of hoops. this is the most amazing sneaker store you have ever seen in your life. it turns out, footlocker owns it. this morning, goldman sachs put a pot on footlocker. i just wanted to reiterate it, they also have a woman's sneaker store. connell: whatever the newest sneaker was, i think it faded for a while, but now it is back. charles: my son is not into sports, but he knows these sneakers. when the new ones come out, he will let me know. just five minutes ago they were sold out on ebay. first of all, i am not going to get you these sneakers, your grades are not good enough and they cost too much. i do n
to go to -- you got to russia, libya. twenty-three countries. egypt and honduras and the philippines. the leaders of these countries must get that they are doing something wrong. >> they did it easier than in north america. the people who brought in the rule of law and property rights into the united states, the 18th and 19th century, you can't remember that. in the case of these guys, they see that they are poor relative to your wealth. it's easy for them to sycamore is the difference? they are constantly looking so they can recognize much faster. we did not realize the fact it you can determine that a piece of land went from there to year, you can also do it with a movie script. you can also do it with an idea, an invention. and certainly. all of a sudden we started seeing that people just the paper. on top of that, you build a stock market and all that leverage. get you into some kind of trouble, but without which you would not have gotten where you are today. john: property rights give us the power to prosper. thank you. we will be right back. [ male announcer ] in blind taste te
to breaking news out of cairo, egypt. protesters are outraged at egyptian president mohamed morsi's power grab. thousands have gathered calling it the birth of a new pharaoh. attacking the headquarters of morsi's political party in alexandria and set it on fire according to egyptian tv. reza sayah joins us on the phone from tarir square. set the scene for us. reza, are you there? >> reporter: hello? >> reza, can you hear me? >> reporter: carol, i apologize. it is very loud here. i'm going to have a terribly difficult time hearing you. we are at tahrir square where thousands of people have come to protest against egyptian president mohamed morsi and there appears to be clashes between security forces and protest protesters in tahrir square. we just saw hundreds of people run i running away from security forces. we can report that tear gas has been shot in the air, we're assuming by security forces. it's remarkable here, carol, we're hear iing what we heard t years ago during revolution that toppled president mubarak, that people want to topple the regime. you're hearing it again, the anger and
collins said she would need additional information before she could support her nomination. >>> egypt rushing a vote on a final draft of a constitution as protests continue against the president, mohammed morsy. he has faced bitter criticism. >>> the state of texas has filed papers to seize a large ranch owned by the flds, a fundamentalist radical mormon sex that believes in polygamy. its leader, warren jeffs, is serving a life sentence. >>> you never know what you might see on the streets of new york city this is a first. casper the pony and razzie the zebra roaming free on staten island. they got free from the home where they lived. they were returned home safe and sound. >> can you imagine mommy, mommy, look. >> they are getting along just fine. >> moment of kindness captured with a camera. coming up, a young police officer's deed goes viral for all the right reasons.od ays. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ide
electedded muslim brotherhood leader of egypt is facing the same kind of revolt some would say in the streets. we'll keep a close eye on live developments in cairo. our thanks to steve harrigan, just several feet above that scene right now. bill: that is breaking and developing overseas. also back at home we're only minutes away from susan rice and her arrival on the hill. show you a live look where we expect the ambassador to arrive. she will sit down with her harshest critics who say she misled the american people on the attack in libya. we'll get reaction from the man who used to hold her job, former u.n. ambassador to the u.n., john bolton, is our guest next martha: all right. we've got a fox news alert because it is 9:30 on the east coast and there is senator kelly ayotte as she walks into a very important meeting this morning after a couple of months of controversy over this u.s. ambassador susan rice is about to face her toughest republican critics on benghazi. this is a live shot on the interiors and escalators of capitol hill this morning. ambassador rice will sit down with senators
funds. he says he is willing to begin peace negotiations. >> egypt's parliament, dominated by conservative muslims approved a new constitution early this morning. the assembly's more moderate members are crying foul. it is sparking another day of protests against president mohamed morsi. morsi's supporters plan to stage a massive demonstration tomorrow. holly williams is in cairo and has been watching this whole crisis unfold. >> reporter: a week after president mohamed morsi gave himself broad new powers that some egyptians say make him a dictator in all but name his islamist allies have rushed to finish a final draft of the country's constitution. it could now be put to a referendum before the end of the year. protests and violent clashes in cities across egypt, president morsi defended his power grab last night on egyptian state tv. he said his new authority is needed to guide egypt through its democratic transition and that he will give up his expanded powers once the country has a new constitution. a final draft of the constitution is now complete, written and voted on
. they are willing to defend their territory with their lives. in egypt the focus has shifted a bit because politicians are trying to broker a cease-fire or truce between israel and palestinian factions. there are sticking points but there are signals or at least some early signs that a truce may be on the horizon that would be welcome news for people certainly in gaza and also in israel. back to you. >> thank you so much for that. reporting through the weekend and today from gaza. oil prices rising as fighting between israel and hamas does continue. could this be the beginning of a bigger price pop and where should you park your money in the complex? we have the senior energy analyst at raymond james. good morning to you. >> thanks for having me. >> the conventional wisdom last week is because it doesn't directly involve iran, maybe the impact on the complex not as dire as it might be under other scenarios. do you agree with that? >> there should be no impact at all from what's happening currently on the israel/gaza border. none whatsoever. the reality is that the oil market is very jitter
down with egypt's president in cairo. we'll be following that as well. >>> all right. coming up on "morning joe" -- former national security adviser dr. brzezinski. hardball's chris mathews, dan senor back on the show, and actor john o'hurley will be here with two special guests to preview thursday's popular national dog show. up next, mike allen with this morning's politico playbook. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good wednesday pomonk to you. busy travel day. the last thing we needed was a large area of the country with heavy fog. i expect significant problems in the midwest. the northeast, clouds are moving out, just like yesterday in many areas. no travel concerns whatsoever for all of the busy i-95 cities. airports are off to a good start and they should remain that way during the day. of course be there can be some volume issues because of so many people. that's about it. nice forecast and the winds should remain light. your flight should be a relatively uneventful flight in the eastern seaboard. to the problem area, areas of gray, dense fog adviso
is the role of egypt with its leadership. a relationship that is much closer now to hamas. is that something that the white house should be concerned about? i mean, that really does seem like really a wild card in all of this. >> suzanne, i don't think it's a wild card. you are spot on. they do need to be concerned about it. more importantly, they need to do something about it to insure that israel is able to prosecute what it needs against hamas and that egypt and the muslim brotherhood stay out of any type of direct engagement or support to what is taking place in gaza right now. that would truly inflame and kind of put into greater can i ones what's taking place in the middle east, so israel needs to breathe -- apologies. egypt needs to breathe through their nose and just stay where they are. hamas and israel are going to have to work this out, and they don't need to have other folks meddling other than to try to get them to calm down, you know, settle the situation a little bit. >> to the other story that we're following. obviously, the scandal involving the former cia director general d
to egypt hoping the leaders can solve the mess. >> the egyptian have an interest in the region not exploding. they will have to take serious steps to make it clear to hamas they will lose support. >> egypt watch what you do and how you do it. you are teetering with the congress of having aid cut off if you continue to incite violence. >> brian: what about the arab democracy? our next guest is a former cia agent with the unit. michael, another conflict between the israelis and palestinians. and the center piece is gaza. what is different now? >> what is different now, america had invested in 50 years in tyranny to make sure israel was suppressed and the america protected. when arab spring came. people including senator graham predicted just a secular democracy and it was a arab spring of secularism. people will turn in a time of turmoil to their faith or what they believed in for a thousand years. we have governments in libya where our people were killed and now in egypt that are going to support their breathern. >> brian: what is the best conclusion and best way to end. >> i am
to israel as a terrorist state after attending talks in egypt. president obama spoke by phone yesterday to both morsi and netanyahu during his trip to southeast asia. in gaza hamas is calling for israel to stop killing its leaders and end a six-year blockade. meanwhile, new explosions continued through palestinian territory. they say they targeted the national islamic bank which they accuse hamas of using to pay its employees. an nbc analysis found israel has killed nearly 40 hamas militants over the last week, often using high precision drone strikes but the civilian toll has been high as well. thousands of people turned out for the funerals of four young children killed in an israeli air strike. meanwhile, israel's so-called iron dome missile defense has helped keep most missiles out of heavily populated areas. still some have made it through, like this rocket that hit a school. joining us now, nbc's eamon ayman in gaza. >> reporter: according to israeli military, more than 100 hit the gaza strip. this morning palestinian officials say the death toll from the past seven days has now r
, and once again here's matt. >> savannah, thanks. turning overseas, violence is still raging in egypt over the president's power graham grab there. nbc eayman mohyeldin is in cairo with the latest on this. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, matt. a few days ago president morrisey of egypt was receiving praise from around the world including u.s. president barack obama for brokering that cease-fire and today he's coming under criticism that puts him in conflict with the top judges that. political fight is spilling over into the streets, claiming lives and plunging the country's economy into turmoil, and more importantly it is threatening the country's post-revolutionary progress. for a fourth straight night protest efforts attacked the offices of president mohamed morsi's freedom and justice party. the political wing of the muslim brotherhood. demonstrators are angry at president morsmorsi's latest decision, one that's reverting the country to a dictatorship. >> we want a contry of institutions, not symbolized in one person who makes all decisions and nobody can say no. >> repo
into israel. hamas says the can conflict caused $1.2 billion to the economy. >>> in egypt, dueling rallies are planned. police and protesters are planned at tahrir square. jim maceda is live in cairo. can you put a perspective on this? i understand there are going to be demonstrations from both sides. >> that's absolutely right. i'll tell you, alex, you won't see many of them down below me here in tahrir square, nor will you see them throwing rocks at the police. but the average egyptians, since there's no polling on this, they are just as worried and angry about what morsi has done. morsi in putting his own will, his own voice above the wall, that he's, in fact, snuffing out the will of the people and all those other voices of egyptians who are not muslim brotherhood. many egyptians were killed down below and up to 11 thour,000, i understand, wounded since the uprising, did that in order that people's voices would be heard and reckoned with and they are angry that his camp is in a very brazen way trying to silence that. morsi's decrees, they say, feel they are a sign of times to come. it
hillary clinton announces the truce from cairo. brokered and monitored by egypt's new government. it calls for both sides to end hostilities. get perspective from national security correspondent jennifer griffin who lived and worked in that region. this coming black friday could be a dark time for nation's largest retailer. some of wal-mart's 1.5 million employees may picket outside stores to publicize their complaint. the group organizing event is affiliated with a big labor union. look at the connection. and illinois democratic congressman jesse jackson junior resigned. he was just re-elected but he has been missing from work for months with mental health issues and he is under investigation for possibly misuse of campaign funds. "special report" at washington starts at 6:00 eastern. now have back to new york and "the five." ♪ ♪ >> eric: talk about keeping healthy. from airport trade to hotel remote control. a lot of things can spread germs around. how do you avoid getting sick when you travel? [ coughing ] >> kimberly: how do i avive every time? >> eric: what is the germiest place o
and rain returns on wednesday. >>> and that's your latest forecast. >> dylan, thanks. >>> now to egypt, where protests have erupted over president mohamed morsi's decree expanding his power. jim is in cairo. good morning. >> reporter: almost two years after their revolution, egyptians seem more divided than ever. after many hear their elected leader has driven the wedge deeper and wider. at dawn, there were more tents and protesters around tahrir square, but that didn't stop clashes with police, where protesters blocked traffic defying president mohamed morsi's orders. after morsi declared sweeping powers for himself, leaving him above the law. >> translator: we are here because the goals of the revolution have yet to be achieved. >> reporter: morsi told his supporters he had to take radical measures to protect the revolution. and fast track a new constitution being written by a mostly islamist assembly, after which he said he'd give up those powers. yes, he might be a dictator for the time being, but these powers will be transferred to an elected parliament, he said. but the decrees h
, this is the first day of the truce brokered by egypt and the u.s. of course, the question, how long will will it last. tensions remain high, we will have a live report from jerusalem. president obama is calling for a unity on this thanksgiving day and urging americans to put aside partisan differences and work together. and comes as the advanced cliff and tax deductions for charitable giving and take a look at that. and black friday shopping, starts in hours. some are having a jump on the traditi traditional season and one is wal-mart, embroiled in an issue. we'll have a live report on that. and special report starts at 6 eastern. for now we'll take you back to "the five." ♪ ♪ don't know much about history ♪ ♪ don't know much biology >> are you ready? >> oh, anyway, don't know much about history? apparently not. you're not alone. dave mccollough, one of the greatest historians thinks we're on the path to illiteracy. >> we're raising children that are by and large historically illiterate. a young woman came up to me and said that until she'd heard me speak she never understo
the hour. egypt's assembly passed a new rushed draft constitution. the 85-member mostly muslim brotherhood assembly passed 234 articles. the draft will be presented to morsi and approved by the egyptian people. the language is open to interpretation and may allow conservative islamists to impose a version of law. human rights groups say it's full of holes. the proposed constitution has an anger against the expanded presidential powers. >>> the supreme court will decide whether to tackle same-sex marriage. they will consider requests to review cases. a violation of the constitutions equal protection revisions. they only recognize marriages between a man and woman. it's also considering a challenge to prop 8, that's california's ban on same-sex marriage which voters approved in 2008. >>> listen up. we now know the identity of one of the two power ball jackpot winners. mark hill is the owner of $294 million. he bought his ticket in missouri. he confirmed on facebook saying quote, we are truly blessed, we are lucky winners of the power ball. his son talked about the moment his dad broke the go
for life. only from aveeno. egypt's tahrir square. they say that they are going to stay there until mohamed morsi gave back the powers that he took himself days ago. liberates and moderates feel that he's trying to push the democracy back into dictatorship. president morsi says it will remain this way until the constitution is finalized. i want to bring in reza sayeh. first of all, give us a feeling of what is happening on the streets and how people feel about where they are in this. >> reporter: well, protesters are still here, nowhere near the numbers of the 1 million demonstration last night. but we have a whole bunch of other collision courses taking shape, suzanne, that could complicate this. here's why. president morsi wants the new constitution drafted immediately. 100-member panel has been designed to write this new constitution but there's been a whole lot of problems and conflict. the panel is dominated by supporters of the muslim brotherhood, islamists. many liberal members have quit and protested. >> reza, we have breaking news. senator bob corker, a republican from tennessee re
there in the middle east. you've got syria, the iranian nuclear thing, the constitutional struggle with an egypt. you potentially have jordan getting in the mix. plus you've now got the oldest of the issues, the israel israeli/palestinian issue. this is facing barack obama at a time he wants to do more in asia, deal with the fiscal cliff. welcome to your second term. >> a lot to do. richard haa ss. >> how did jerry adams do it? how did the irish terrorists as they were called before the peace deal, how did they not only enforce the peace but then turn to their own bad elements and say, step out of line, and we're going to crush you. >> one was, they couldn't shoot their way to power. tony blair, the irish prime minister gave them a political path that was legitimate. there was a potential there for compromise. they had discipline in their own ranks. >> how did they do that? how would hamas discipline the extremists? >> at some point -- listen, in the history of every opposition movement, there's a time when there's a civil war where people who want to compromise have to deal with the radicals who don
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